Taking Notes in English – Part 6 of 7: Review, Revise and Preview Lecture Notes

I’ve so far posted on what tools to use, verbal cues, non-verbal cues, note-taking systems, and shorthand (abbreviations and symbols) for my series on note-taking. What follows is part six, which is about how to revise, review, and preview your […]

Taking Notes in English – PART 5 of 7: Shorthand

In the last post, I presented you with 4 systems for taking notes. Now it’s time to cover a technique you can use to write information more quickly, which is a simple form of shorthand – using abbreviations & symbols. […]

Taking Notes in English – Part 4 of 7: Systems to Record

Welcome to part four on my series about taking notes from lectures that are given in English. We’ve covered what tools to use, and the verbal and non-verbal cues to pay attention to so that you know what is important […]

Note Taking in English – PART 2 of 7: Verbal Cues

In my last post I went over what tools you should use when taking lecture notes. Hopefully, you learned that it’s not ideal to write down everything you hear because you’ll be too focused on the task of writing instead […]

Taking Notes in English – PART 1 of 7: Tools

In this post I’m diving into the first post of seven in a series about note-taking in English. If you’re learning English at university through content-based instruction, you’ll definitely need to know how to take notes. How do you take […]

10 Tips for Writing Effective English Summaries

People summarize all the time in their day to day lives. You might summarize something interesting that you read in the news. You might summarize what happened at a party that your friend missed because she was sick. You might […]

How Long does it Take to Learn English?

How long does it take to learn English? As an English teacher, this is a question I get asked over and over. My answer is always the same: It depends. More specifically, it depends on these four main factors: How […]

60 strategies to improve your English

This is a hodgepodge (a mixture) of strategies I often share with my students in Japan to encourage them to become more accountable for their own learning. Good language learners are very proactive. Do you use all these strategies? Are they any you think you should use more?